Imaginary Life

Turning Wasted into Wanted.

Food for Change a new platform in Stockholm. Food for Change is a CSR platform for businesses connecting waste food with people in need. Local supermarkets explore how to reuse all the waste food they throw away every day, by creating a membership scheme for low-income people. Membership or gift cards for people in need costs roughly 50 euro to gain access to regular food deliveries. The programme invites volunteers to deliver the food to local communities. Many large companies invite their employees to take part in the scheme as a CSR effort.

A few other examples of green initiatives turning wasted into wanted:

Networks: The carpet manufacturer Interface has created a sustainable line of products called Net-Works. Net-Works is the first step in creating a truly restorative loop in carpet tile production, whilst cleaning up oceans and beaches of plastic and creating financial opportunities for informal economies; some of the poorest people in the world.

A firm in Brazil, Arteplas, is taking plastic bottles out of landfills and repurposing them as high quality rope. Treehugger reports that their product is both higher quality and cheaper than traditional rope constructed from fibres. Arteplas have independent analysis from a third party assessor showing that their recycling processes for rope use 70% less energy than ropes from virgin materials. Their plant employing up to 400 local people. The quality of the product, is proven in the success of the company and its applied use across different industries.

Blest. Making oil from waste plasticsTypically made from petroleum, it is estimated that 7% of the world’s annual oil production is used to produce and manufacture plastic. That is more than the oil consumed by the entire African continent. A Japanese company called Blest created a small, very safe and easy-to-use machine that can convert several types of plastic back into oil. Amazing. A machine like this would be invaluable to informal waste pickers the world over, allowing them to add value to collected plastics.

Financiamento para Cooperativas de Catadores de Lata Cooperetiva Amigios do Planete Na foto Manuel Basílio,Responsável pela Cooperativa e Adivaldo Oliveira  Foto Adenilson Nunes  Data 09/02/11 Local Portão de Lauro de Freitas Ba

The Green Hanger Made in Australia from 100% recycled cardboard, the Green Hanger will be used as an event invitation during Tokyo Designers Week, then as a coat hanger. The Green Hanger eco coat hanger is a fully recyclable and biodegradable cardboard coat hanger made from 100% recycled materials.
kids hangers

Parapu Durapulp pressed chair by Södra in Sweden is a winner of the Red Dot Design award; the product concept is a collaboration between an ad agency, the pulp manufacturer, KTH and famous PR-driving designers Claesson Koivisto Rune. DuraPulp is a new material that combines paper pulp and PLA (a biodegradable plastic) to create an incredibly resistant paper. Created from one pressed cut out sheet the new product demonstrates how a simple manufacturing process can add value to raw waste materials and create perceived value for the hotels and companies who use it.
PULP CHAIR

Eco-Drywall: While recent interest in sustainable building has spurred the creation of eco-minded materials like Greensulate and Cow Dung Bricks, drywall is one building component that has remained essentially the same over the past 100 or so years. That’s about to change, however, thanks to EcoRock, a new drywall material that’s made of 80 percent recycled materials.

Poly-Al is made from recycled Tetra Pak. Tetra Pak Europe pays a local producer to take care of old Tetra Pak. He removes the paper part and recycles and then uses the plastic/metal foil part to make a board, 15 mm thick, flat or corrugated that is used as a building material in walls or roofs. It is water proof, fire resistance and uses no additives in the compression process. They have started to use it for making cow-sheds in India and it has increased the milk productivity with 2-3 l per cow per day! It keeps the cows cool and comfortable, and is a beautiful material as well!

For more cases see The Ellen Macarthur Foundation. 

Seeing things differently

Visualizing complexity is a design approach that has always been used to handle multi-layered facts and perspectives. By using creative methods to visualize dry data, diverse people in an organization can be engaged in critical decision-making, from the outset of a project through to continuous improvement out on the marketplace. Turning dry facts into deep insights enables rapid and relevant decision-making. And it is only the people within a company who can know what relevant steps are needed for innovation. There is no one-size-fits-all approach. Doing the right things based on the wrong assumptions is not innovation.

Maps have to be ‘designed’ correctly for the task at hand. Take the world map as we know it today. The Gerardus Mercator’s projection was first published in 1569, and became widespread because it depicts a line of constant bearing as a straight line, which was relevant at the time for marine navigation. But the drawback of using that map today, to visualize new and existing business markets, is that it distorts the shapes and relative sizes of all the countries. The map also distorts our perception of the world. The map of True Africa created by Kai Krause, shows that Africa is far larger than we think. Then see the maps on land area to population, or amount of money per head spent on healthcare, and we instantly gain a more informed picture on which to base our innovation strategies.

The True Africa map by Kai Krause shows the size of the continent in relation to European counties.

The True Africa map by Kai Krause shows the size of the continent in relation to European counties.

The Gerardus Mercator’s projection was made for marine navigation.

The Gerardus Mercator’s projection was made for marine navigation.

Map from worldmapper.org shows public health spending to population

Map from worldmapper.org shows public health spending to population

Innovation is not so much of an outcome, as a process of asking the right questions at the right time, and asking them again and again, reiteratively. Since a company’s offering exists in real-time, across connected or digitally enabled networks, so too do the insights and information that continuous questioning and decision making are based on need to be in real-time. Innovation means never being satisfied with the obvious assumptions. And to break preconceived ideas we now have big data and data visualization.

Although a company cannot map all the potential outcomes of its activities, visual maps can play a large part in nurturing breakthrough thinking so that a company can focus on what it does best – and partner for the rest. Data visualization has yet to find its role in delivering real-time information for communications within a company, for critical decision making, or for real time communications between a company and its network, who, in a connected world, should be more deeply engaged in the ongoing strategies, activities and outcomes that bring to life a brand’s vision of innovation.

Maps don’t always make good online interfaces, but they do help us understand data in an intuitive way. Moving into a service-driven world, a company’s offering is continuously evolving and data visualization can be used to engage different types of stakeholders in the ongoing process of value generation. Imagine, for example, a call to action to developers to test and hack a beta digital service “pre-launch”. Or real time, localized invitations for users to swarm around an open innovation event, on and offline. Or adding services by using data collected from the public realm, such as traffic or weather reports, or national averages on life expectancy in relation to lifestyle choices. Innovation should be continuous rather than be an occasional manned mission to Mars. When users are informed and communicated with in more personal and transparent ways, they are more likely to offer up their own data to share in the benefits of ongoing innovation.

Maps in themselves do not tell us what to do: but they can help us harness knowledge and creativity to solve problems, and that is true innovation. No market research report or marketing message can compete with factual, real time information. We need to use technology and its designs to help us question all the assumptions that we take for granted- and make sure our good intentions result in meaningful activities.

 

Urbanflow Helsinki

Urbanflow envisions a new interface and operating system for cities. Urbanflow creates a more efficient, transparent relationship between city administrators and citizens – via real time data. Urban screens show locally-oriented and general purpose data in easy to use interfaces that help with all sorts of everyday activities from finding your way to getting info on energy, weather, traffic, public transport, and more. Citizens can also report anything from an event to a pothole in the city. The same urban screen shows contextual, hyperlocal information as well as broader, citywide content, allowing users to peek around walls and across the city. For officials and administrators this means making the city more transparent and efficient to manage through immediate feedback from the city’s residents. Watch the Urbanflow Helsinki Intro.

Fragmented by choice?

Consume less, live more?

Interesting article in the Guardian about choice and marketing. And a great quote from Professor Tim Jackson, the author of Prosperity Without Growth: “We buy things we don’t need with money we haven’t got to make impressions that don’t last on people we don’t care about.” In his book, he describes how the never-ending spiral of over-consumption has led us into never-ending spiral of debt and cultural decay in Western society. And moreover, how “We do not have investment structures, investment markets, investment conditions that are suitable to lay down the infrastructure to allow people to make better choices.”
But marketeers take note: its not all do-goodiness in his message. It’s proven that consumers who are faced with too much choice, make no choice at all. In fact, the biggest luxury of our age is to be totally relieved from the stress of choice making. To check into a Japanese Ryokan, on the top of Mount Koya, to be served a set breakfast and told when to take a bath, and what to wear; what could be a better remedy to the stresses of modern day life?

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Chinese Newspapers report on Swedish Design

The articles surrounding the Shenzhen Industrial Design Conference go something like this:
“Sweden: Design for Better Business
Sweden is the first country to become industrialized in Scandinavia and also the earliest country to develop the industrial design movement. IKEA and VOLVO have been icons in people’s minds, standing for Swedish design.
The Swedish designers coming this time are well prepared, not only for the signing ceremony, but also for holding presentations sharing their experience in furniture design, interior design, industry design and other types of design.”

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Serve

The power of X: A collaborative process 协作过程

“If you are committed to serve, there is always endless opportunity.”
如果你致力于服务,那么机会就会源源不断。

Here are some notes we used in China on turning risk into value.
将风险转化为价值

The reality: Resources- both material and human – come at an increasing cost. Which makes business more and more risky – financially, environmentally, and socially. At the same time, customers are going “back to basics”. They are claiming the service, that has been stripped away by mass production. Once again they are demanding value in exchange for buying a product. Consequently, two different economies are emerging. The thriving and the struggling.

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As Lao Tse might have said: The door is there, use it!

A shared brand vision for better business?

A shared brand vision for better business.
为了创造更好业绩的共同品牌视野

Successful global companies know who they are first and foremost. They have a 2020 vision, and a roadmap of how to get there. A clearly defined 2020 brand vision will help your business rise above product category, economic downturn and consumer trends. Successful companies can survive change because they are designing change. This means asking the right questions at the right time: How do you want to serve people and society? What are the needs of the people who make up your business?

成功的全球化企业首先要有自知之明。他们有着2020年的视野,对于如何达到目标了然于胸。 一个定义清晰的2020品牌视野将会帮助提升你的生意,超越产品类别,走出低迷的经济和萧条的消费趋势。成功的企业之所以能在变化莫测的世界中存活下来是因为就是他们在设计着这些变化。这意味着要在正确的时间问正确的问题:你想如何服务于人们和社会?你的顾客有什么需求?

At Imaginary Life, we see brands as partnership platforms. Branding engages people in a shared vision; people at the company, partners in the value chain, end consumers, and even competitors. Imaginary Life designs global communications platforms for people to engage in and share your company’s brand vision.

在Imaginary Life, 我们将品牌视为合作平台。设计品牌将所有的人融合到了一个共同视野之中;企业员工,在价值链上的合作伙伴,终端的消费者,甚至是竞争对手。Imaginary Life设计全球交流平台,让人们参与其中,共享你们公司的品牌视野。

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IMG_3049

Why some companies are keeping quiet about sustainability

The companies who are keeping quiet about sustainability fall into two categories: the ones who know what they are doing, and the ones who don’t. Denial ain’t a river in Egypt, as they say in Cairo. Our oceans are dying, our air changing, and our forests and grasslands turning to deserts. From fish and plants to wildlife to human beings, we are killing the planet that sustains us, and fast.
But telling this to business people is like showing a smoker a slice of a cancer infected lung. It just doesn’t work. No matter how eco-conscious the person is- the catastrophe scenario is just too much to take on, emotionally, and viably. And quite frankly- isn’t it up to our governments and politicians to sort out this mess? The UN treaty on climate change — our best hope for action — expires next year. As it looks like, the US corporate-nation-democracy will not take the lead – leaving every other nation on the fence? We suspect not. But let’s stick to business for now.
Forward looking companies realize that drastic change in legislation is inevitable, and are already quietly working towards a 2015 change in legislation that will exceed any CSR law being mentioned today. Far beyond the blanket calls for lower carbon emissions and the carbon payoffs, a cradle to grave product life-cycle responsibility is almost certain to put many successful companies today exactly there: in the cradle if not the grave.

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At your service

At your service

Sitting in meetings, couldn’t help wondering –what we are here for? To shift more stuff, with the communications plasters of premium design and graphical brand concepts? Or can we consultants learn to apply design & management processes so that companies can leapfrog to newer business models that are more innovative by nature? Looking out the hotel window over a view of Shanghai Gotham City, it’s easy to forget at what cost this incredible view comes. And what will our skylines be like in 2050, 3050?

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1960's Shanghai Taxi

The semiotics junkyard

You’ve heard it before but I just want to remind you: The global communications grid is having more impact on how we live than the railway and electrical grids ever did. What we fail to remember, in all the clutter of the Internet, is that it is no older than a newborn baby. It’s like Detroit out there, I heard someone say, and even Google can’t sort through that kind of mess. The baby has dirty diapers on but that is also set to change with the emergence of an evolved mobile network- where every everyday life transaction is Internet-enhanced. Where no amount of censorship can stop the emergence of a technology-enhanced IRL (real life). It’s the “Internet of Things” that Chinese companies are working on, today, while the floundering US/UK lead West try to impose new invisible borders of control, more fitting to the Great Chinese Firewall than that of democratic nations.
Technological possibilities are growing far faster and smarter than our businesses or systems of control. But if we navigate this complexity with a “Scandinavian” reframing of our global context to serve humanity, there are literally endless possibilities to do good business – for good (sic). Call it “Folkhemmet” 4G, or Corporate social integration. Call it what you will but “branding” doesn’t make the cut.